Graduate Education

Weill Cornell Graduate School of Medical Sciences (WCGSMS)

For more than a half-century, WCGS has focused on preparing its students for careers in the biomedical sciences. The Graduate School faculty today numbers more than 250, and more than 1,000 students have earned Cornell University PhDs from the school.

Physiology, Biophysics and Systems Biology (PBSB)

The PBSB graduate program website includes exciting information about the research and academic activities of the Faculty engaged in world class research aiming to understand the functional mechanisms in the human body, in health and in disease.

Tri-I PhD Program in Computational Biology and Medicine (TPCBM)

The Tri-I PhD Program in Computational Biology and Medicine (CBM) was established in 2003 to provide a unique training opportunity that takes advantage of the exceptional educational and research resources of Cornell University in Ithaca, its Medical College in NYC (Weill Cornell Medical College), and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. It is our belief that the development of such a cadre of computational biologists, trained in the laboratories of exceptional program faculty from all three campuses, will foster discovery in frontiers of basic biological and biomedical sciences.

Tri-Institutional PhD Program in Chemical Biology (TPCB)

The Tri-Institutional PhD Program in Chemical Biology was established in 2001 as one of the first graduate programs in the world to focus on research and training at the interface of chemistry and biology. The program is a collaborative offering of three premier New York City institutions, Weill Cornell Medical College, The Rockefeller University, and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Located adjacent to one another in the heart of Manhattan’s Upper East Side, these three institutions combine to create a unique university environment and provide unparalleled scientific opportunities to the next generation of leaders in chemical biology.

Herzlinger Lab

The 3-dimensional organization of blood vessels within different organs differs dramatically reflecting the circulatory system’s role in mediating organ specific functions, in addition to gas and solute exchange. We study how the unique architecture of each organ’s vascular bed is established in the developing mouse embryo, and have identified several novel transcription factors and cell-cell interactions that regulate this process

Huang Lab

Our current research includes the structural biological studies to understand the mechanisms by which G-protein-coupled receptors activate G-proteins, and translational cancer biology. We are developing small-molecule compounds to block tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis, as well as to reinvigorate anti-tumor immune response. We also investigate the physiological functions of G-proteins in blood vessel formation and bone homeostasis.